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, requires us all i think he rethink how we stand in the middle east. so tonight i'd like to talk about the three threats to the united states that emanate from the persian gulf. iran, saudi arabia, and what i call al qaeda -ism. in speaking tonight about the persian gulf, and the war against the islamist militancy emanating from there, i want to start with words george washington used to describe the new national governments responsibilities to ensure that americans clearly understand the threats they face at home and abroad. i am sure that the massive citizens of these united states meanwhile, washington told john j. in 1796. and i believe that they will always act will whenever they can update a right understanding of matters. let me say that i share washington's fate and he essentially sound common sense of american. except perhaps that of the coming generation whose male members seemed unable to figure out how to put a baseball cap on so the brim points forward. but i'm not saying saying that when a national government under either party is capable or even desirous of the actually
of libya. >>> on the border. a rare look at the daily game of cat and mouse that the u.s. is fighting against drug smugglers. >>> "america at the crossroads." tonight why america's losing some of the best and brightest and how to keep them here. >>> and tired of it all. alarming news about a problem that impairs our economy, our health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the president of the united states is now on record. the longtime libyan leader needs to leave and change must now come to libya. this is how the president put it at the white house today. >> let me just be very unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his country. it is good for his people. it's the right thing to do. >> of course, that brings us to the question about how to do that, how to finish what the libyan uprising has started. there's growing support for a so-called no-fly zone, but the defense secretary continues t
with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. [music] [applause] good afternoon, everybody. thank you for joining us today. the first thing i will ask you to do is put your hands together in front of our heart and bow slightly and say nanasta it means the good in me greets the good in all of you. who knows where is this is from? india. today we are sharing an form. we are members of the dance company based here in
, none of us used this product today. here is a run down of my beauty routine, some of the things i was supposed to, 40 hormone chemicals, 17 carcinogens, 17 penetration chemicals. they draw others more deeply into the property. 16 toxins, less than 50 percent of my chemicals has been assessed by any publically accountable institutions. there are no government requirements for us to understand these chemicals. we have a lot of information about some of them. most of them have never been -- the combined mixtures of a developing teenager saying day after day year after year. there is a lot we don't know. what do know there is a tremendous amount of scientific evidence that showing low doses of chemical exposures can interfere with hormones, change the way our genomes for diseases that come down the long. most important time of development in the womb, teenagers developing. we also know that disease chronic disease is meaning chemicals are on the rise, breast cancers. who knows a young cancer or family member that has breast cancer, infertilities, testicular cancer. there is a lot of e
for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling with robert gates as he travels here in afghanistan as well. all of that in a moment. but first, check in with shannon bream in the washington bureau for the top headlines of the day. >> thank you, bret. >> shannon: president obama ended a two-year ban on guantanamo bay and it will come two days ahead of congressional hearing about the danger of american radicalized by the terrori
suggested? using the constitution? or use the money to repay money we've already borrowed? adding debt will help enslave future generations of to us the lenders. from new york, defending freedom, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >>> welcome to afghanistan for a special edition of "special report." i'm bret baier. we have been traveling for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling wi
civilians." 10 security councilmembers voted yes on the resolution. u.s., u.k., france, bosnia- herzegovina, columbia, garr bon, lebanon, nigeria, portugal, south africa. five members abstained -- russia, china, germany, brazil, india. the 10 votes was just one more than the nine needed for passage. and it did not include input from the 192-member united nations general assembly. but international support for the no-fly zone is now waning. the libyan government is alleging that coalition bombings have killed many civilians. doctors on the ground say over 100 civilians have died. military deaths not included. the 22-member arab league this week accused the u.s. and the coalition of ignoring the u.n. >> as far as we're concerned the arab league, we requested the security council to establish a no-fly zone in order to protect the civilians, in addition to safe areas for the civilians to sit in without attacks on them. >> brazil, russia, india and china, the bric nations, are all calling for an immediate cessation of the no-fly zone. u.s. defense secretary robert gates says it's gaddafi that is
? >>> there is word that moammar gadhafi wants to trick journalists that innocent civilians have been killed. u.s. officials say that gadhafi was not the target of a missile. he wants bodies removed from morgues and put at the site of the bombing to make it look like innocent people were killed. military officials say they have made significant progress. they believe the attacks against his own people have all but stopped and air defense batteries have been destroyed. on air force one, secretary robert gates says the united states will not be leading the charge for long. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition but not the preeminent role. >> jim is joining us live from tr tripoli. what are we hearing about these plans that moammar gadhafi -- what is happening with these bodies? >> reporter: right. the plan to move these bodies from morgue into bomb sites and then bring foreign journalists like us to report on that beefed
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors, sendin
and women of the u.s. c services. i very much appreciate the support today and i would like to recognize dan branch to get the executive director for the contributions to put this together. now for the core of today's event. the united nations estimates indian ocean piracy costs 5 to $7 billion annually. though there are only a few attacks that make news they still occur on a daily basis as the tragedy proved last month with the deaths of four american hostages. parts are increasingly resilient, bold and adaptive free fighting tactics by implementing -- increasing manpower through recruitment. the real question is how can the global community meet this evolving fret be on the horn of africa. looking at numbers as much as $238 million in 2010, which was roughly $5.5 million. to enter these questions about piracy we have assembled a panel of the steamed experts who delivered a brief opening remarks and answer your questions. i will introduce four of them to you now. to my right terence mcknight has commanded numerous ships for the u.s. navy as well as multiple assignments on land for the up th
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
's an article iii. what i'm trying to talk about is separate, the next step. and i think petitioners use third party standing is just out the window whether it's separation of powers tenth amendment, anything. >> thank you. you have four minutes. >> thank you. just a few points in rebuttal. first of all, one reason not to carve out special rule for commandeering claims is that not all commentary claims are created equal. mr. dreeben praise thee, to claim that it's been litigated in the context, the sex offender registration act that i don't know if the details are that the commandeering claim are not. but i concern imagine a commandeering case, the federal statutes. the problem is right now the lower courts are not following the standing issue from the challenges based on a careful analysis of article iii standing redress ability or prudential stand for that matter. they are resolving those with these simple and let's move on. a second reason that you should not try to carve a commandeering cases as being somehow the residuum of the tennessee electric victim is because tennessee electric says
granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on march 30, 2011, at 9:32 a.m., that the senate passed without amendment h.r. 1079. with best wishes i am. signed sincerely, karen l. haas, clerk of the house. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following enrolled bill. the clerk: h.r. 1079, an act to amend the internal revenue code of 1986, to extend the funding and expenditure authority of the airport and airway trust fund, to amend title 49, united states code, to extend the airport improvement program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on the motion to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. any recorded vote on the postponed question will be taken later. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the
. >> for all of us here, thanks for watching. >>> tonight on "world news," surviving cancer. the number soars. now 1 in 20 americans. tracking the progress and the new help for patients and families. >>> muslims under fire. a muslim congressman chokes back tears at a heated hearing on homegrown terror. >>> rising danger. severe damage has flooding spreading and powerful storms sending rivers over their banks. our reporter on the scene with even more heavy rain on the way. >>> and, made in america. the newest challenge in the middle of grand central station. and an even bigger reveal. the new jobs being sown in the u.s. right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers for disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively. and ron claiborne is here with what it all means for the survivors
in tripoli as the air assault continues, there are questions and concerns about what role the u.s. will may in in the operations going forward. the pentagon insists the u.s. forces will have a limited role, but are not clarifying the mission. >> it is unwise to set a specific goal, things that you may or may not be able to chief. >> president obama's walking a political tight rope. focusing on his domestic agenda while facing questions about his decision to authorize force. >> we are answering the calls of a threatened people and we're acting in the interests of the united states and the world. >> it is distracting us from what's going on in bahrain, what's going on in syria where repressive governments are cracking down on peaceful dissent. >> and criticism from both sides of the aisle. leb rals led by dennis kucinich, jerrold nadler and maxine waters raise constitutional objections. conservatives said the president waited too long to act. >> i regret that we didn't act much more quickly, but that's not the point now. the point is let's get behind the effort. >> and then there's the questi
sown in the u.s., right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers of disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively, and ron claiborne is here with what it all means. this is such encouraging news. >> reporter: this is really important news tonight, george. so many people are now living with and beating cancer. four times as many as 40 years ago. in fact, the cdc said today that for millions of americans, cancer is now a manageable disease. >> reporter: they send us their videos. poignant messages celebrating their struggle against cancer. and more and more americans are winning the fight. the centers for disease control says as of 2007, nearly 12 million adult americans were cancer survivors, people living with cancer or who've beaten the disease, compared to just 3 mill
details to emerge. we have not seen the word defection use by the foreign office but there is no doubt that this is a senior figure turning his back on it gaddafi. >> the bbc's world affairs editor is in tripoli. he says that colonel gaddafi is going to be too concerned by the resignation. >> this will have an impact but we have to remember that gaddafi has lost plenty of ministers before. his interior minister is now a senior figure in benghazi. there have been others as well. my guess is that they will stop this off. whether moussa koussa will be such a gain to the rebels and their representatives in london is uncertain. we must remember that some people have been in accusing him of involvement with the lockerbie bombing, for instance. he was the head of intelligence for colonel gaddafi. that is not a neutral post. nevertheless, it means that they're going to be people are around colonel gaddafi that will be thinking now about their future is very carefully. but at the same time, this is really a one horse government. it is all about colonel gaddafi and those people who are loyal to
coastal town of -- a key coastal town. the libyan forces used tanks and artillery. our world affairs editors sent this report. >> at dawn this morning, it was a media elite clear that the rebels enthusiasm and fighting spirit was fading. it has carried them 150 miles westward along the coast, beating colonel gaddafi's troops back. but other supply lines are stretched and gaddafi's troops are fighting a more friendly territory. we went with the rebels to the next town, which they attacked fiercely. but the offender's head -- the defenders had better weapons. when we went there, we found the rebels had faded away during the night. from a distance collies i checkpoint which we eventually decided was probably manned by gaddafi loyalists. it was. a couple of soldiers opened fire in our direction. >> keep your head down. >> we drove back hastily down the road to the important oil town captured by the rebels on friday night. today, far fewer of them were making a stand here. the rebels are being forced all the way back to ras lanuf. it has been quite a success for colonel gaddafi's army. th
for us for now. of t tv. that's all for us for now. >>> hello, cnn center, here's a look at your headlines. the united nations has appointed jordan's former foreign minister as the envoy to libya. he will head up a humanitarian assessment team. that follows a weekend of heavy fighting between rebels and pro-gadhafi forces. some of the worst battles took place in miisrata. meanwhile, unrest continues across the arab world. gun shots were heard in cairo on sunday and demonstrators were targeted by soldiers with stun guns. demonstrators know that dictator hosni mubarak is gone. >>> japan, the government is reeling from another scandal. maehara quit on sunday after revealing he received a $3,000 campaign contribution from a korean who is not a japanese citizen. and japanese law forbids such gifts. >>> jacque chirac is about to be tried on criminal charges. his trial on corruption charges dating back decades begins today. the aging chirac denies any wrong doing but could face up to ten years in prison if he's convicted. and that's a quick look at your headlines right now. i'll see you
alaska, and those trillions of cubic feet of natural gas could be brought out of the ground and used to take care of our energy needs to a very large degree. as a matter of fact, the coal shale -- let's put that chart up there -- the coal chail that we have, they. -- shale that we have, they estimate it would create 1.8 trillion to eight trillion barrels of oil right here in this country and it would immediately reduce our dependency on foreign oil. and you think the saudis and others wouldn't lower their price per barrel very quickly if they thought we were producing that you're just not paying attention. if they thought we were becoming energy independent they would want to keep their market share and lower their prices as quickly as possible. and then you talk about coal itself. we have tremendous resources of coal. 584.5 billion tons our reserves in coal, the blue places you see on the map is four trillion tons of coal. now, they say that will hurt the environment. well, we got to make sure we protect the environment and we got scrubbers on the generating plants and all kinds of
will tell you that the systems used by agencies are fine. the systems that trigger uses are fine and the budget is where the decisions are made anyway. the important data set that is used for oversight and -- by the government and public is not good enough to be used. there are efforts under way to correct the problem. it is a good example about how there it is a lot of excitement around usaspending.gov, but the data has been unusable since the 1970's. the systems we use to track tax expenditures are worse. no one bothers to go back and check whether the estimates issued are correct after the numbers come in to the irs. the two systems used to track our never reconciled with one another. legislative information is still a rite of passage for technologists like myself. at this point, congress is making positive improvements but it is still difficult to work with. we never have access to the source data. we want the files that are the base line ingredients used to draft legislation. we can see them in the pdf's released but it cannot get the actual files. one more step back. i want
to stop what it calls a disproportionate use of force against citizens. now, this follows a weekend of deadly clashes between rebels and pro-gadhafi forces. it was in misrata that some of the heaviest fighting took place. these are pictures from right after the battle there. troops loyal to moammar gadhafi stormed the city with tanks and artillery. but the opposition stood its ground. the defenders armed with anything from sticks to machine guns. the rebels claimed victory. but there were people killed on both sides. in fact, a doctor in misrata's central hospital says 42 people died on sunday, 17 from the opposition, and 25 from pro-government forces. 85 people were wounded. many in civilian clothing. the youngest was a 3-year-old killed by direct fire. >>> the capital tripoli is still in the grip of the government. on sunday, the latest of several large pro-gadhafi demonstrations was held. witnesses say police searched vehicles to try to stop anti-government protesters from taking to the streets. many of the people taking up arms against colonel gadhafi have little or no military
at capitol hill. it is monday, march 21st. with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. good to have you. we have adjunct senior fellow for middle east studies at the council on foreign relgsz, dan seymour, good to have you back on the show. and i think the "new york times" headlines is the big question, target clear, inten is the not. >> it says it all, really. >> what is the intent, are we at war, dan? >> we're basically at war. >> basically. that seems to be in dispute. >> in a civil war. >> for the last three weeks we said gadhafi had to go. we hadn't formally taken sides. this weekend, we've taken sides. gadhafi has to go. >> that's not the objective. >> there may be ambiguity. the world will view this as a failed intervention if this ends and goadhafi is still in power. >> he's also committed acts of terror against the united states, pan am flight 103 and will use his oil money to exact revenge on us. for all of those who are so seger to engage in a no-fly zone, like they were playing a video game, then the natural consequences that would come from
at student cram.org -- student cam.org. >> joining us on newsmakers on this sunday is greg jaczko, thes chair of the nuclear regulatory commission appointed by president obama.ucle thanks for being with us. >> guest: thanks for having me. >> host: joining us with the questioning is matt wald, new york times, and steve power, both energy reporters. you for being with us. >> thank you. >> host: you're going to get a status report tomorrow on what happened in japan and lessons learned for the u.s., what do you think you're going to s learnsome. >> guest: we're going to have a meeting tomorrow with the full commission at the nrc to get an update on the current status onm the situation in japan. we'll probably have a brief discussion then about what kind of impact radiation can have for the public, and then we'll take a look at some things, kind ofei plan for a plan for how we intend to go forward to do our review and look at what, what kinds of thing we may need tod look at for the u.s. nuclear reactors. >> host: and with the fukushima plant in particular, we're told this morning that two of the
example of that. it used to be conventional wisdom you had to choose between mubarak and the muslim brotherhood. and with this huge amount of information that's been flowing in into egypt for several decades now, it's filled in the middle. there's now something that wasn't there before. >> rose: a program note. we expected to show you this evening conversations with mike huck bea. we'll show you those interviews later this week. tonight, lakhdar brahimi and joe nye when we continue. seven years ago, i had this idea. to make baby food the way moms would. happybaby strives to make the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card to further those connections. last year we took dozens of trips using membership rewards points to meet with the farmers that grow our sweet potatoes and merchants that sell our product. we've gone from being in 5 stores to 7,500. booming is using points to make connections that grow your business. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city,
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
contaminated with radiation. workers are using sandbags and concrete panels to hold back the water. >>> pakistan's cricket team have been practicing for a game for which their world cup, standing, and national pride are at stake. on wednesday, pakistan plays india. a big match helping to soothe often bitter relations. thousands of people are expected to skip work to watch the game. i'm zain verjee in london. "world business today" starts now. >>> good morning from cnn london. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chu. this is kporld business today. the top stories on this wednesday, march 30, tepco's troubles keep mounting up. now the company's president has been hospitalized, apparently suffering from stress. >> high fuel prices and natural disasters clip qantas' wings. how the australian airline is cutting back. >> and businesses in india and pakistan are bowled over by the cricket world cup. >>> so, wout further adieu, take you to how the stocks are trading in europe. one hour to the trading session. here's how the numbers stack up presently. after a couple of da
useful, he became so rich, he bought his freedom. when we returned about that, we -- when we learned about that, we suddenly learned about a connection to marina's family. >> so i had always known about my family's connection to sugar because my great grandparents traveled from india across to guyana which is in south america, but it's considered part of the caribbean, and they came to cut, to work on sugar plantations. so part of what fascinated us was what is this substance where someone in be his family -- in his family all the way in russia, a serf, and someone in my family looking to get a better life over here in india and then over to the caribbean, what is this substance that could effect people from such different parking lots of the world? -- parts of the world? >> and before we trace that out, we want to ask you a question. how many of you think you might have sugar somewhere in your family background? so that's one, two, three -- oh, man, yes! yes! >> all right. what i'm going to do, i just want to hear from a couple of you where your family might have been from, okay? >>
firmment of issues out there, and as important as these are, these issues are to us and our viewers, the american people, when you stack them up against the national debt, the national defense, the weighty issues that they're wrestling with, you know, we're not at the top of the list. and usually after an election like this we have divided government, coming up to a presidential election, pretty much anything that's going to pass on it own for its policy merits has got to happen before the august recess because the window closes. everything after that that passes either passes out of political necessity or to keep the government running. and so it'll be all politics all the time pretty much after labor day. so whether it'll happen or not remains to be seen. but when it comes to us and auctions, it -- we volunteer to help, but we're really concerned about how you talk about repackaging. as for the radio issue, we, we got really close with them. we're still at the table. we hope they come back. we think there's a community of interest, but i can't and won't abandon radio, small and la
with netanyahu and will give us the latest in minutes. >> it has been one year since president obama signed the national health care law. is it working? do people love it or hate it? why are some states exempt? who is still putting up a fight? why is the president trying to keep the health care law way from the supreme court? is he afraid of what they will say? attorney general cuccinelli is here plus governor palin. >> hold on to your seats for this one. is did -- is donald trump a birther? you will hear directly from donald trump. we have a jam-packed show coming to you live from naples, florida. sarah palin joins us in two minutes. first live to libya. steve harrigan joins us live from tripoli. >> reporter: the attacks here now coming into the city of tripoli by fighter jets. libyan's air defenses have been knocked out. less expensive option now being used. we've heard several explosions to my right near the presidential compound one mile away. of course gadhafi himself was speaking before human shields at that come upon yesterday. pentagon officials have said he himself is not specifica
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 308 (some duplicates have been removed)

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